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October 13, 2010

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Mark, thanks for sharing this story. I have seen this happen more than once myself.

Clearly, if the food/beverage cart is blocking the pathway to the rear restrooms, passengers should be permitted to use the one in first class.

Most elderly people do not thave the ability to 'hold in in' so to speak as they once did in their younger days.

I sure hope to live until 85. And if such an instance happens to me, well just let your imagination think what I may do....

Martin

I am sorry to read this. My Mom and Dad both had incontinence issues... at 85, most people do! I hope they come up with better policies for us as we age. Here's an interesting article that might help better prepare for incontinence concerns. http://carebuzz.com/health/diseases-management/urogyn/urinary-incontinence/treat-for-incontinence/

BUT it doesn't surprise me how the attendant responded. I remember being on an American Airlines flt. a couple of years ago and needed help lifting my bag (I'm not 85 but over the age of 50).. I asked the flight attendant (male) to please assist me... you won't believe his answer... "I don't do bags".

While I understand the policy around worker's comp.. I found his reply appalling - are you kidding me? You don't do BAGS? You're a flight attendant for crying out loud! At least come up with a more reasonable answer like "my back is out".

Carol,

No excuse for this - it comes down to selection and training. Selection meaning the airlines shouldn't hire people as flight attendants who are not interested in assisting and helping people. Training meaning they could be better trained in how to properly respond - communicate - to passengers. There is a nice/right way to say no.

Ironically, the airlines have nobody to blame but their own policies when it comes to the problems with heavy carry-on bags. Ever since the airlines started charging for checked bags you see double the number of carry-on bags leading to delays in takeoff as staff gate-checks bags when overheads get full (and they always get full) and the problems you describe in your post.

Anyway - thanks for reading and lets hope the airlines develop more understanding and sensitivity to the aging population.

I guess you can threaten to pee in the seat unless they let you use the forward facilities. Maybe that would get a better response from the flight attendant!

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